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Organization Revisited

Organization Revisited

By Nicole Villalpando - Austin American-StatesmanSeptember 3rd 2016

Marie Kondo writes in her best-seller “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” that tidying up is “a special event, not a daily chore.” She espouses that once you tidy up your whole house, you won’t have to constantly tidy up, you’ll just have to put things back where they belong.

 

Marie Kondo does not live with my family. We are constantly having to tidy up, to sort through the mounds of stuff coming in, most of which needs to go out again.

Last year as part of the Your Home series, I interviewed experts on garage, closet and pantry organization and took on these projects at my house. For one day, these spaces looked like what you see in a magazine. And then life happened.

 

Now, a year later, I reassessed these spaces and rolled up my sleeves to get organized again.  “People think that you get organized and you’re done,” says Deniece Schofield, author of “Confessions of an Organized Homemaker: The Secrets of Uncluttering Your Home and Taking Control of Your Life.” “Somebody has to keep it organized.”

 

While we might want to nag and scream when the family doesn’t follow the system, the reality is someone has to take ownership of keeping the organization system working. And that someone is usually the person who created the system, the one for whom it matters most.

 

Many organizers use acronyms to describe the process of organizing your stuff. Austinite Lorie Marrero, who created Clutter Diet, a home organization online subscription service, uses ORDER:

 

Marrero says people fail most often at the first step by not outlining the plan before starting and at the last step by not revisiting the site to rework it.

 

When things don’t go well, people often will ditch their current system and go looking for another system, another product or another magic bullet to solve their problem, says Barry Izsak, certified professional organizer and owner of Arranging It All in Austin, Texas. He reminds that “the best organizing system in the world isn’t going to last if you don’t stick to it.”

 

The easiest way to stick with it is to have a system that everyone in the house understands. An easy system will make people more likely to put things back the first time.

Catch yourself when you think “I’ll just put it there for now and I’ll put it away later,” Izsak says. We all know that later often doesn’t happen.

 

Ideally you can then spend five to 15 minutes a day just running through the house and putting anything out of place back. Or, when you see something out of place, move it to the right place right away. “When you do a quick pickup, you don’t give it the opportunity to pile up,” says Leslie Byer Rosner, a professional organizer with Found Space Organizing.

But if you have let it pile up, it’s time to start over, maybe not from scratch entirely this time.

 

Some key tips from our experts to make the pileup less likely to happen:

The Arranging it AllSM team is mentored and trained by a Certified Professional Organizer.

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